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January 31, 2017 – 1:38 pm | 59 views

What Works For Anxiety Disorders–Anti-Anxiety Drugs

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The Politics of Withdrawal

Submitted by on August 19, 2016 – 9:38 am | 31 views
The Politics Of Withdrawal

The Politics of Withdrawal

In some ways the issue of coming off is deeply political. People of all economic and educational backgrounds successfully reduce or go off their psychiatric medication. However, sometimes can determine who has access to information and education, who can afford , and who has the opportunity to make . People without resources are often the most vulnerable to psychiatric abuse and injury from drugs. Health is a human right for all people: we need a complete overhaul of our failed “” in favor of truly effective and compassionate alternatives available to everyone regardless of income. Pushing risky, expensive drugs as the first and only line of treatment should end; priority should be on prevention, providing safe places of refuge, and treatments that do no harm.

Numerous studies, such as Soteria House in California and Open Dialogue in Finland, show that non- and low-drug treatments can be very effective and cost less than the current system. And a medical product regulatory establishment that was honest about drug risks, effectiveness, and alternatives would likely have never put most psychiatric drugs on the market to begin with. Instead of viewing the experiences of madness only as a “dis-ability,” which can be a stigmatizing put down, it is helpful to also view those of us who go through emotional extremes as having “diverseability.” Society must include the needs of , creative, , and unusual people who make contributions to the community beyond the standards of competition, materialism, and individualism. To truly help people who are labeled , we need to rethink what is “normal,” in the same way we are rethinking what it means to be unable to hear, without sight, or with limited physical mobility.

Universal design and accommodating those of us who are different ultimately benefit everyone. We need to challenge able-ism in all forms, and question the wisdom of adapting to an oppressive and , a society that is in many ways itself quite crazy. A means accepting human differences, and no longer treating the impacts of poverty and oppression as medical problems. Our needs are intertwined with the broader needs for social justice and .

Source: Harm Reduction Guide to Coming off Psychiatric Drugs (Second Edition)

A previous article entitled How Do Psychiatric Drugs Work? provides information... anxiety, compulsiveness ve coping mechanisms

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