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What Works For Anxiety Disorders–Anti-Anxiety Drugs

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Home » Antianxiety, Antidepressants, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Major Depressive Disorder, SSRI

Lexapro

Submitted by on November 21, 2010 – 2:02 pm | 324 views

What is ?
Lexapro (escitalopram oxalate) is a (SSRI)
Lexapro is available by prescription only

Lexapro has been proven safe and effective for the acute and maintenance treatment of MDD in adults and adolescents (ages 12-17) and for the acute treatment of (GAD) in adults.
Lexapro has been prescribed to over 18 million U.S. adults
Lexapro 10mg/day may significantly improve the symptoms of depression (MDD) in adults and adolescents (aged 12-17) and anxiety (GAD) for adults

How Lexapro works

Lexapro is believed to work by increasing serotonin, a substance in the brain believed to influence mood.
How SSRIs work

Although the brain chemistry involved in depression or anxiety is not fully understood, it is widely recognized that chemical messengers facilitate communication between nerve cells in the brain and are involved in regulating many aspects of behavior and mood. These chemicals are called neurotransmitters and it is believed that neurotransmitter imbalances play an important role in the development of depression and anxiety. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that has been clearly linked with most, if not all, forms of depression. SSRIs are believed to work by blocking the reabsorption (reuptake) of serotonin in the brain, thus increasing available serotonin.

What is Lexapro?
Lexapro (escitalopram oxalate) is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI).
Lexapro is available by prescription only.

Lexapro has been proven safe and effective for the treatment of depression (MDD) in adults and adolescents (aged 12-17) and for the treatment of anxiety (GAD) in adults.

Lexapro is believed to work by helping to restore the brain’s chemical balance; it increases serotonin, a substance in the brain believed to influence mood.
Lexapro 10mg/day may significantly improve the symptoms of depression (MDD) in adults and adolescents and anxiety (GAD) for adults.
Lexapro for Depression (MDD) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) in Adults

Lexapro (escitalopram oxalate) is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) indicated for the acute and maintenance treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults and adolescents aged 12-17 years and for the acute treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in adults.
Lexapro is a once daily treatment for both depression (MDD) and anxiety (GAD).
The efficacy and safety of Lexapro for the treatment of MDD in adults was established in several clinical trials involving more than 1,100 adult patients, including men and women, ages 18-65.
The efficacy and safety of Lexapro in the treatment of GAD in adults was established in several clinical trials involving approximately 850 adult patients ages 18-80.
Lexapro has been prescribed to over 18 million U.S. adults.

Taking Lexapro
Lexapro is taken once daily with or without food. Always tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription medicines or over-the-counter remedies you take.
In clinical trials, the most common side effects associated with Lexapro treatment in adults were nausea, insomnia (difficulty sleeping), ejaculation disorder (), , increased sweating, decreased libido, and anorgasmia (difficulty achieving orgasm). Side effects in pediatric patients were generally similar to those seen in adults; however, the following additional side effects were reported commonly in pediatric patients: , urinary tract infection, vomiting, and . This is not a complete list of side effects. For more information, see Lexapro Prescribing Information. Always take Lexapro as prescribed by your healthcare professional.
Lexapro as a Treatment for Depression and Anxiety (GAD)

Lexapro has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment to relieve symptoms of MDD in both adults and adolescents and GAD in adults. You may notice an improvement in symptoms in a few weeks; though, you should continue taking Lexapro as directed by your healthcare professional. Lexapro has been prescribed to over 18 million patients. There is no generic available for LEXAPRO. Your doctor prescribed Lexapro for a reason.
Lexapro as a Treatment for Depression

Lexapro has been proven to be a safe and effective treatment for depression. In controlled studies, Lexapro significantly improved the symptoms of depression in both adults and adolescents.

Medicines can sometimes work differently in different people. Talk with your healthcare professional before stopping Lexapro or changing your dose.

Remember, it is important to take your medicine for as long as your healthcare professional advises, even if you start feeling better. Otherwise your symptoms could return or worsen. Full recovery takes time.
Lexapro as a Treatment for GAD

Lexapro has been proven to be a safe and effective treatment for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). In clinical studies, Lexapro significantly reduced the symptoms of GAD for many adults.

Remember, it is important to continue to take your medicine as long as your healthcare professional advises, even if you start feeling better. Otherwise your symptoms could return or worsen. Full recovery takes time.
Different are just that – different.
Not all antidepressants are interchangeable.

Your doctor selects and prescribes a specific antidepressant for you based on careful consideration of your symptoms, your medical history, and specific medical needs. After your doctor gives you your prescription, make sure you get exactly what your doctor ordered when you go to the pharmacy. This is especially important if you are doing well on treatment. It is important to start and stay on a medication that effectively relieves your symptoms and that you tolerate well. If you are doing well on treatment, switching your medication may compromise your treatment.
If your doctor prescribed Lexapro for you, he/she chose Lexapro for a reason.

Your doctor chose Lexapro because he or she believes it is the right treatment for you. While there are generic versions of other antidepressants, there is no generic version available for Lexapro.

Fill your prescription as prescribed right away – the sooner you begin Lexapro treatment, the sooner you may begin to feel better.
– Full antidepressant/anxiolytic effect may take 4 to 6 weeks.

When you are at the pharmacy to fill or refill your Lexapro prescription, remember:
To double check that your prescription for Lexapro is filled exactly as written by your doctor.
If a pharmacy recommends a switch to another medication, you will not be getting what your doctor prescribed because there is no generic available for Lexapro.
Your doctor prescribed Lexapro for you based on a thorough medical examination and that antidepressants are not identical or interchangeable.
If Lexapro is working for you, stick with it and take Lexapro exactly as prescribed by your doctor.
Set a date for when you need to come in for your next Lexapro refill.
If you think you are experiencing side effects, you should talk with your healthcare professional.

What are the Possible Side Effects of Lexapro

In clinical trials, the most common side effects associated with Lexapro treatment in adults were nausea, insomnia (difficulty sleeping), ejaculation disorder (primarily ejaculation delay), fatigue and drowsiness, increased sweating, decreased libido, and anorgasmia (difficulty achieving orgasm). Side effects in pediatric patients were generally similar to those seen in adults; however, the following additional side effects were commonly reported in pediatric patients: back pain, urinary tract infection, vomiting, and nasal congestion.

These are not all the possible side effects with Lexapro. Please see the Important Risk Information, including boxed warning at the bottom of this page, and the full Prescribing Information.
Do not take Lexapro if you are:
Taking or have recently taken a type of drug called a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI), such as Nardil® (phenelzine sulfate) or Parnate® (tranylcypromine sulfate)
Taking a type of antipsychotic medicine called Orap® (pimozide)
Allergic to or have had a bad reaction to Lexapro, any of the components of Lexapro, Celexa, or generic citalopram
Taking Celexa® (citalopram) or generic citalopram

Also, to avoid a serious or potentially life-threatening condition, tell your healthcare professional if you are taking, or planning to take, any prescription or over-the-counter medications, including:
Other SSRIs, serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), certain migraine or headache medications (triptans or tramadol), or tryptophan
Any other medication prescribed for a psychiatric or neurological condition
NSAID pain relievers (such as Advil®, ®, , Aleve®, or naproxen), aspirin, warfarin, or blood thinners
Diuretics

Nardil is a registered trademark of Parke Davis.
Parnate is a registered trademark of GlaxoSmithKline.
Orap is a registered trademark of Teva Pharmaceuticals USA.
Advil is a registered trademark of Wyeth Consumer Healthcare.
Motrin is a registered trademark of McNeil Consumer Healthcare.
Aleve is a registered trademark of Bayer HealthCare LLC.
1. Why was I prescribed Lexapro?
Lexapro is a prescription medicine for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults and adolescents aged 12-17 years and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in adults. MDD and GAD are real medical conditions that require diagnosis and treatment from a healthcare professional. Lexapro is a safe and effective medication that may help improve symptoms of depression in adults and adolescents aged 12-17 and generalized anxiety disorder in adults. Your healthcare professional chose Lexapro for a reason. There is no available generic substitute for Lexapro. Fill your prescription right away, the sooner you begin taking Lexapro as prescribed by your healthcare provider, the sooner you may begin to feel better. For more information, see: How Lexapro Works.
2. What is Lexapro?
Lexapro is an antidepressant and a member of the family of medicines known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).
3. How does Lexapro work?
Lexapro is believed to work by increasing serotonin, a substance in the brain believed to influence mood.
4. When will I start feeling better?
You may notice an improvement in 1 to 4 weeks; however, you should continue to take Lexapro as directed by your healthcare professional. Full antidepressant/anxiolytic effect may take 4 to 6 weeks. You should follow up with your healthcare professional and report your progress. Don’t feel discouraged if your symptoms don’t improve right away. For some patients it takes longer. Keep taking your medicine until your healthcare professional advises differently. For more information, see: Should I Take Lexapro Daily?
5. Can I stop taking Lexapro once I feel better?
While you may notice improvement in a few weeks, you should continue therapy as directed by your healthcare professional. Your healthcare professional may ask you to keep taking Lexapro even if you are feeling better. Only your healthcare professional should determine the appropriate length of treatment. Talk with your healthcare professional before stopping Lexapro or changing your dose. For more information, see: For how long should I take Lexapro?
6. Are there side effects with Lexapro?
In clinical trials, the most common side effects associated with Lexapro treatment in adults were nausea, insomnia (difficulty sleeping), ejaculation disorder (primarily ejaculation delay), fatigue and drowsiness, increased sweating, decreased libido, and anorgasmia (difficulty achieving orgasm). Side effects in pediatric patients were generally similar to those seen in adults; however, the following additional side effects were reported commonly in pediatric patients: back pain, urinary tract infection, vomiting, and nasal congestion. This is not a complete list of side effects. For additional information, please see Full Prescribing Information for Lexapro.
7. Can I use Lexapro if I am pregnant?
Talk to your healthcare professional if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while taking Lexapro. There have been no studies done that show Lexapro is safe to use in pregnant women. Therefore, Lexapro should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the unborn child. Be sure to talk to your doctor about this important decision.
8. Can I use Lexapro if I am breastfeeding?
Patients should be advised to notify their physician if they are breastfeeding an infant. Lexapro, like many other medicines, is excreted in breast milk. Therefore, the doctor and patient must decide whether to continue or discontinue either nursing or Lexapro. The decision to continue Lexapro should take into account the risks for the infant and the benefits of Lexapro for the mother.
9. Does Lexapro cause weight gain?
In controlled studies, clinically important changes in body weight were similar for patients treated with Lexapro and those treated with placebo (sugar pill). If you have concerns about any side effects, you should talk with your healthcare professional.
10. How and when should I take Lexapro?
Lexapro should be taken once every day. It may be taken with or without food, in the morning or evening. Remember to fill prescriptions ahead of time to avoid missing a dose. To get the best results, it is important to follow all of your healthcare professional’s instructions about how and when you should take Lexapro.
11. Can I take Lexapro with other medicines?

Do not take Lexapro if you are:
Taking or have recently taken a type of drug called a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI), such as Nardil® (phenelzine sulfate) or Parnate® (tranylcypromine sulfate)
Taking a type of antipsychotic medicine called Orap® (pimozide)
Allergic to or have had a bad reaction to Lexapro, Celexa, generic citalopram, or any of the components of Lexapro
Taking Celexa® (citalopram) or generic citalopram

Also, to avoid a potentially serious or life-threatening condition, tell your healthcare professional if you are taking, or planning to take, any prescription or over-the-counter medications, including:
Other SSRIs, serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), certain migraine or headache medications (triptans), tramadol, or tryptophan
Any other medication prescribed for a psychiatric condition
NSAID pain relievers (such as Advil®, Motrin®, ibuprofen, Aleve®, or naproxen), aspirin, warfarin, or blood thinners
Diuretics
12. How else can I help my recovery in addition to taking Lexapro?
Be sure to keep follow-up appointments with your healthcare professional. He or she needs to track your progress. In addition to taking a medicine such as Lexapro, you may want to participate in psychotherapy or “talk therapy.” These counseling sessions can help you understand how your disorder affects you and find ways to cope with the illness. Regular physical exercise can also improve feelings of well-being. In addition, it may help to cut back on or eliminate caffeinated beverages such as coffee, tea, or soda. To find out which of these or other suggestions might be right for you, talk with your healthcare professional.
13. Will Lexapro affect my sex drive?
Although changes in sexual desire, sexual performance, and sexual satisfaction may occur during a depressive episode, they may also be a consequence of treatment with SSRI therapies including Lexapro. If you have questions about sexual dysfunction, speak with your healthcare professional.
14. Can I drink alcoholic beverages while taking Lexapro?
You should avoid drinking alcoholic beverages while taking Lexapro.
15. What should I do if I miss a dose?
If you forget to take your prescribed dose of Lexapro, take the missed dose that same day as soon as you remember. The next day, resume according to your regular dosing schedule. Doubling a daily dose to compensate for a missed dose is not recommended. If you have additional questions about dosing, please talk to your healthcare professional.
16. What if I have more questions about Lexapro?
Your healthcare professional should be able to answer any questions you have about your treatment. For additional information, please see Full Prescribing Information for Lexapro.
17. For how long should I take Lexapro?

Depression and generalized anxiety disorder are usually chronic medical conditions that may require long-term treatment. If your symptoms are currently controlled and you stop taking your medication for a few days, you run the risk of a relapse.

However, it is important to take your medicine as long as your healthcare professional advises, even if you start feeling better; otherwise your depression or anxiety could return or worsen. Full recovery takes time.
18. Will Lexapro work better than my current medication?
Only your healthcare professional can determine whether Lexapro is the right treatment option for you. Speak with your healthcare professional before stopping any medication. Only a healthcare professional can make decisions regarding your treatment. For more information about talking with your healthcare professional, see: Talk with Your Doctor.
19. Is there a generic Lexapro?
No, there is no available generic version of Lexapro. If your healthcare professional prescribed Lexapro, make sure your pharmacist fills as prescribed. Your healthcare professional prescribed Lexapro for a reason and can share with you why they chose Lexapro for you. For more information, see: Why Take Lexapro or Talk with Your Doctor.
Source: http://www.lexapro.com

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