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January 31, 2017 – 1:38 pm | 408 views

What Works For Anxiety Disorders–Anti-Anxiety Drugs

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WHAT ARE THEY?
Anti-anxiety drugs are used mainly for …

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Mood Stabalizers »»» Depakene Depakote sprinkles Lamictal (lamatrogine) Lithium (lithium carbonate) Eskalith Lithobid

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Anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) are the main form of treatment for people with epilepsy. There are around 26 AEDs used to treat seizures.

Home » Antianxiety, Antidepressants, Antimanic Agents, Antipsychotics, Mental Health Medications, Stimulants

How Do Psychiatric Drugs Affect The Brain?

Submitted by on August 18, 2016 – 12:04 pm | 104 views
ow Do Psychiatric Drugs Affect The Brain

How Do Psychiatric Drugs Affect The Brain?

Like any mind altering substance, psychiatric drugs are psychoactive and alter mind and behavior by affecting brain chemistry. Their usefulness, and risks, come from changing the brain/body and altering consciousness, including and placebo.

Current medical theory is that most psychiatric drugs change the levels of chemicals called neurotransmitters (anti-convulsants, , and “mood stabilizers” such as appear to work by and electrical activity in the brain in general). Neurotransmitters are linked with mood and mental functioning, and all the cells of the nervous system, including , use neurotransmitters to communicate with each other. When neurotransmitter levels change, “receptor” cells, which receive and regulate neurotransmitters, become more sensitive, and can grow or shrink to adjust.

SSRI (“selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors”) for example are said to raise the level of the neurotransmitter serotonin in the brain and reduce the number of brain serotonin receptors. like lower the level of dopamine and increase the number of dopamine receptors in the brain. This action on neurotransmitters and receptors is the same as for any . Alcohol affects neurotransmitters including dopamine and serotonin, and cocaine changes the levels of both dopamine and serotonin, as well as noradrenaline, and alters receptors.

While these changes in your body take place, your consciousness works to interpret and respond in your own way, Alcohol might relax you or make you nervous; anti-depressants energize some people or make others less sensitive. Because of the and expectation, everyone is different. Your experience of medication may not be the same as other people, and will ultimately be uniquely your own. Trust yourself.

Source: Harm Reduction Guide to Coming off Psychiatric Drugs (Second Edition)

A previous article entitled PSYCHOSTIMULANTS BRAND NAMES (GENERIC NAMES) AND SIDE EFFECTS provides information... “Zombie” demeanor, Abdominal pain ve Adderall (amphetamine and dextroamphetamine)

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